ABO Blood Group, Socioeconomic Status, and Cognitive Function: Evidence from College Students for Better Visual Recognition Associated with the Type O Phenotype

Graham Pluck

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

2 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The ABO blood group system is associated with neurological health and cognitive impairment, and also with structural differences in the healthy human brain. The current research aimed to examine how blood group may be associated with cognitive functioning in non-clinical participants. Participants were 132 students at two universities in Ecuador. All were assessed for blood group and a range of cognitive abilities with known neurological substrates: shape recognition (‘ventral visual route’), spatial vision (‘dorsal visual route’), language-syntactical processes (left perisylvian), focused attention (right perisylvian), executive function (dorsal prefrontal), advantageous decision making (ventral prefrontal) and declarative (medial temporal) and procedural (basal ganglia) learning. Socioeconomic status (SES) was assessed as a potential confounding variable. Preliminary analyses revealed that ABO blood type frequencies showed a cline, varying by site of data collection, and Type O blood was more common in participants from lower SES backgrounds. Additionally, higher SES was associated with better cognitive performance. Significant positive correlations were found indicating associations between higher SES and better performance on tasks of language, and executive function, and for declarative and procedural memory processes. With SES and data-collection site covaried, precategorical visual shape recognition task performance was observed to be the only factor significantly associated with blood group, being better in participants with the Type O phenotype. This result was present in two different samples and was significant with or without the use of covariates. I conclude that, in this sample from Ecuador, human blood group classification was linked to variability in adult human neurocognitive function, specifically, shape recognition task performance associated with occipito-temporal processing. This may have implications for understanding variation in neurological and cognitive health, as well as cognitive abilities as individual differences, and potentially provides a biomarker for efficiency of human object-recognition skill.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)493-524
Número de páginas32
PublicaciónJournal of Cognitive Science
Volumen23
N.º4
EstadoPublicada - 2022
Publicado de forma externa

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