Demography and life history of wild red titi monkeys (Callicebus discolor) and equatorial sakis (Pithecia aequatorialis) in Amazonian Ecuador: A 12-year study

Sarie Van Belle, Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Anthony Di Fiore

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

43 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

We investigated demographic patterns and life history traits from several groups of red titi monkeys (Callicebus discolor) and equatorial sakis (Pithecia aequatorialis) monitored throughout the first 12 years (November 2003 through May 2015) of an ongoing research project in the Yasuní National Park and Biosphere Reserve, Ecuador. The saki groups ranged in size between two and six individuals, comprising either one adult male and one adult female or multiple adult-sized males or females, plus immatures. Deviations from a pair-living structure resulted when two different daughters of the resident female grew up and successfully reproduced in their natal group and when an adult-sized male temporarily immigrated into the group when it already contained an adult male. The titi groups also ranged in size between two and six individuals, but almost exclusively lived in groups with one adult individual of each sex. No titi offspring were observed to breed in their natal groups, and both male and female offspring dispersed when they were between 2.1 and 5.0 years old. In both titi and saki groups, vacant breeding positions resulting from the disappearance of an adult group member were promptly occupied by immigrants of the same sex as the disappeared group member. We recorded nine saki and 28 titi births. Eighty-three percent of the titi births occurred between September and January, suggesting reproductive seasonality. The mean interbirth interval after an infant survived its first 6 months was 21.3±SE 1.9 months (N=3) for sakis and 14.5±SE 1.5 months (N=14) for titis. Saki infant survival was 70%, and juvenile survival 57%. Titi infant survival was 88%, and juvenile survival was 53%. This 12-year study provides important insights into the functioning and maintenance of pair-living and social monogamy in two little-known platyrrhine species. Am. J. Primatol. 78:204-215, 2016.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)204-215
Número de páginas12
PublicaciónAmerican Journal of Primatology
Volumen78
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 feb. 2016
Publicado de forma externa

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