Separate contributions of general intelligence and right prefrontal neurocognitive functions to academic achievement at university level

Graham Pluck, Carlos B. Ruales-Chieruzzi, Edgar J. Paucar-Guerra, M. Victoria Andrade-Guimaraes, Ana F. Trueba

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

24 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

It is hypothesized that performance on frontal-lobe neuropsychological tests and intelligence tests may independently contribute to variation in academic achievement in higher education. We examined the ability of an IQ test (the WAIS-IV) to predict grade point averages (GPA) in a sample of 64 undergraduate students. We also included a battery of five neuropsychological assessments of frontal-lobe functions, all known to be unrelated to general intelligence and linked to right-prefrontal function. Regression analysis with stepwise entry of variables revealed separate contributions to the variation in GPA scores explained by general intelligence and two different measures of response inhibition (Stop-signal and Hayling). The addition of the inhibition measures more than doubled the amount of variance in GPA explained by general intelligence alone, from adjusted R2=.115 to adjusted R2=.239, suggesting an important role of right prefrontal-mediated response inhibition in high-level academic achievement. This contrasts with the mainly left-hemisphere contribution from general intelligence.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)178-185
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónTrends in Neuroscience and Education
Volumen5
N.º4
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 dic. 2016

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