Sloths strike back: Predation attempt by an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) on a Linnaeus's two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) at a mineral lick in Western Amazonia, Ecuador

María Camila Bastidas-Domínguez, Andrés Link, Anthony Di Fiore, Diego Mosquera

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

Resumen

Two-toed sloths (genus Choloepus) are almost exclusively arboreal. However, they often descend to the ground in places known as mineral licks or “saladeros” and feed from soil, which presumably enhances their digestion of toxins and helps them obtain minerals not readily available in their diet. Mineral licks are risky areas which may increase their visitors' vulnerability to predators. Here, we report a predation attempt on an adult Linnaeus two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) by an adult ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) at a mineral lick at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Predation events are rarely recorded in camera traps, and this particular predation event can be considered unusual, given that sloths usually come down to mineral licks during the night. Also, it is not clear how ocelots are able to capture sloths, and other arboreal animals and this record evidence that predation of arboreal vertebrates by ocelots may also take place in the ground. Finally, the anti-predatory behavior displayed by the two-toed sloth demonstrates that there are intrinsic risks for predators while attempting to capture prey.

Idioma originalInglés
Número de artículoe00291
PublicaciónFood Webs
Volumen36
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 sep. 2023

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