Social structure of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in a variable low-latitude environment, the Galápagos Archipelago

Judith Denkinger, Daniela Alarcon, Bitinia Espinosa, Lynn Fowler, Cindy Manning, Javier Oña, Daniel M. Palacios

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

10 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Killer whales (Orcinus orca) have strong social matrilineal bonds and form groups and long-lasting associations, but little is known about their population or social structure in an equatorial setting such as the waters around the Galápagos Islands. Using 91 encounters and identification photographs from 1991 to 2017, we identified 64 killer whales of which 18 individuals were locals with high resighting rates. Group size was small, ranging from 1 to 15 animals, with 69% of the groups containing four or fewer animals. Using social network analysis (SOCPROG 2.7) whales grouped into three distinct units and one loose association with frequent exchange between different groups. One male–male unit showed a strong association (association strength = 0.55). Overall, associations lasted over at least 3 years. Our data give first evidence of a loose social organization of Galápagos killer whales, similar to fission-fusion societies.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)774-785
Número de páginas12
PublicaciónMarine Mammal Science
Volumen36
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 jul. 2020

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