Use of the Veterans History Project to assess World War II veterans' perceptions of military experiences and health

Nancy LaVerda, Andrea Vessey, William F. Waters

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

15 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Objective: This qualitative research study evaluated the attitudes, perceptions, and opinions of World War II veterans regarding the health impact of their military service. Methods: The study design involved adding relevant health questions to the interview format developed by the ongoing Veterans History Project, a military oral history depository directed and maintained by the U.S. Library of Congress. Audiotaped interviews conducted with individuals and a focus group were coded and evaluated. Key informants provided background information. Results: Findings included a general consensus among participants that military service during World War II was beneficial to their health. Preventive health practices were instilled as lifelong habits, as were feelings of self-confidence and independence. The Veterans Administration was viewed positively by respondents but was not used to any great extent. Conclusions: Current good health and feelings of patriotism, duty, and selflessness may underlie expressed positive attitudes about the health impact of service during World War II.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)1076-1082
Número de páginas7
PublicaciónMilitary Medicine
Volumen171
N.º11
DOI
EstadoPublicada - nov. 2006

Huella

Profundice en los temas de investigación de 'Use of the Veterans History Project to assess World War II veterans' perceptions of military experiences and health'. En conjunto forman una huella única.

Citar esto